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Strange but true: 3D print your dinner – New Zealand Herald

by • August 4, 2016 • No Comments

An example of 3D printed food, made by a student of Professor Hod Lipson of Columbia University. Photo / Timothy Lee Photographers/Columbia EngineeringAn example of 3D printed food, made by a student of Professor Hod Lipson of Columbia University. Photo / Timothy Lee Photographers/Columbia Engineering
We’re all accustomed to having appliances on our kitchen counters, of toasters and blenders to coffee manufacturers and microwaves.
If Professor Hod Lipson has his way, we’ll soon require to manufacture room for one additional – a 3D food printing device that may revolutionise the way we ponder of food and prepare it.
Over the past year, the Columbia University professor and his students have been developing a 3D food printing device that can fabricate edible items through computer-guided software and the actual cooking of edible pastes, gels, powders, and liquid ingredients – all in a prototype that looks like an elegant coffee machine.
3D food printing offered amazing new options for convenience and customisation, of controlling nutrition to managing dietary requires to saving energy and transport costs to creating new and novel food items.
Lipson sees it as the “output device” for data-driven nutrition and very own health, akin to precision medicine, with massive future for a profound impact.

Lipson is especially excited of working with chefs in trials of the new printing device.
“Putting our innovation into the hands of chefs has enable-bodiedd them to turn it into all kinds of things that we’ve never seen preceding. This is just a glimpse of … what lies ahead.”

Wasp vs WaspAn adult of the Sphecophaga parasitic wasp, that may soon be utilized to battle our pest German and common wasp. Photo Bob Brown/Landcare ResearchAn adult of the Sphecophaga parasitic wasp, that may soon be utilized to battle our pest German and common wasp. Photo Bob Brown/Landcare ResearchContinued at a lower place.

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Scientists are battling New Zealand’s wasp scourge with … wasps.
To assist control German and common wasps that cost our major industries around $130 million every year, Landcare Research scientists are exploring a range of possible biocontrol agents, one of them a sneaky species of parasitic wasp.
Larvae of Sphecophaga feed off their host, some day killing it.
The species was tried as a biocontrol agent against wasps in New Zealand starting in the 1980s, but so far has just built in a few locations.
But, new research suggests this may be for the reason those parasitic wasps had come of the wrong region, and ones advantageous targeted against our UK-sourced wasps can be additional effective.
Interactions between hosts and parasites are rigorous, and actually additional so when the host is a colony-forming insect, as they rely heavily on chemical communication inside the colony.
These chemical signals assist as their language, Landcare scientist Dr Ronny Groenteman said.
“In order for Sphecophaga to go undetected in the nest, they must ‘speak’ the correct language, or dialect, in order to fool their hosts.
“Otherwise, wasps are so hygienic that they can quickly remove any foreign intruders they detect.”

I’ll have what she’s havingMeg Ryan in the movie When Harry Met Sally. Meg Ryan in the movie When Harry Met Sally. In what’s maybe the many explanation of female orgasms since Meg Ryan’s famous diner demonstration of When Harry Met Sally, scientists have pointed to an evolution of ovulation.
The female orgasm, that plays no obvious role in human reproduction, has intrigued scholars as far back as Aristotle.
Numerous theories have tried to explain the origins of the trait, but many have concentrated on its role in human and primate biology.
Now US scientists have provided fresh insights on the subject by examining the evolving trait across various mammal species.
“Prior studies have tended to focus on evidence of human biology and the modification of a trait pretty than its evolutionary origin,” said study author Dr Gunter Wagner, of Yale University’s Systems Biology Institute.
Instead, he and his colleagues propose that the trait that evolved into human female orgasm had an ancestral function in inducing ovulation.

Meet Ronan, the musical sea lionRonan, a California sea lion, knows how to store the beat. Photo / Frontiers; University of California Santa Cruz Ronan, a California sea lion, knows how to store the beat. Photo / Frontiers; University of California Santa Cruz Ronan, a sea lion of California, can store the beat advantageous than any other animal, US scientists say.
Whether it is Mozart, Jimi Hendrix, Miles Davis, or tribal drumming, few activities feel as uniquely human as music and indeed, for a long time, many scholars believed we were the just species capable-bodied of creating and responding to rhythm and melody.
In 2009, this theory was up-ended by a bopping cockatoo called Snowball who was able-bodied to move to music, and now, there’s Ronan.
Following investigations that have shown that chimps, bonobos, parrots and budgerigars have much like capabilities, the head-bobbing sea lion has provided data that may aid scientists in their quest to know the biological roots of musicality.
Experiments with Ronan have suggested the ability was dependent on specialised neural circuits in the brain that are required for vocal flexibility. Rocking Ronan’s achievements, and their accordance with a special physics equation utilized as a test in the study, suggest the neural drivers of beat-storeing may be additional ancient and widespread than previously idea.
NZ Herald


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