24/7 Customer Service (800) 927-7671

Palm Beach investment firm funds 3D printing, high tech nail polish – Palm Beach Daily News

by • January 8, 2016 • No Comments

There is a 3D printer on the island capable of manufacturing multicolored sculptures created up of three various materials. It can print a baby’s bust while it’s yet in the womb using ultrasound files or even convert a photo of a pet into a freestanding photo sculpture.
Biltadditional Technologies Inc., a private equity firm which has invested in multiple startup ventures, has a 3D printer at its Palm Bequite office — and it has been utilized to manufacture ant sculptures for a resident. The soft grass, the leaves, log and ants incorporated into equite sculpture came of the firm’s machine, said Troy Fohrman, co-founder and chief operating officer.
The focus of the firm is not 3D printing for individuals, but its founders and shareholders have agreed to manufacture it available to those interested. The machine utilized by Biltadditional Technologies, the Stratasys Objet260 Connex3, starts at of $200,000.
“No one else can afford this type of equipment unless you are NASA or Lockheed,” Fohrman said.
Though the firm charges for its services, its 3D printer offers a cost-effective alternative to other traditional manufacturing methods.
Fohrman pointed to a photo of a sophisticated model house, the type an architect may commission for a presentation. “To hand build this thing? Something along the lines of this model right here, which is $30,000 to $50,000 worth of labor,” he said.
The firm’s printer can cut the cost of producing which same model to a couple of thousand dollars, Fohrman said. Rendering the design may take of a week and the actual printing may take one or two days, he said.
From shoes to medical services
The possibilities for design and manufacturing using 3D printing, or additive manufacturing as it is in addition known, are approximately limitless.
“We are already designing shoes, women’s shoes, literally one-off shoes which there’s no way you can get them anywhere else,” Fohrman said.
Earlier this week, Daniel Pina, the mechanical design manager at Biltadditional Technologies, met with a training specialist for the firm’s 3D printer manufacturer to discuss advanced techniques for printing molds.
Pina helps startups take products to market through the prototype system. He in addition designs parts for customers. He pointed at a rendering of a smart electrocardiography device he is working on.
“It’s going to be for a man who is sick,” Pina said. “They may use this device to check their heart rate, and it may work through Bluetooth.”
The cost-effectiveness of rapid prototyping through 3D printing technology allows for entrepreneurs to go through additional iterations of a product preceding taking it to market. “So the customer can manufacture most variations of his prototype precedinghand, preceding he goes to manufacturing. He can get trials done. He can get consumer feedback done at a much lower cost,” he said.
For information of 3D printing and the company, visit bilttech.com or email info@bilttech.com.
Nail polish by phone
North End resident Dean Woodman is an investor in Biltadditional Technologies. Woodman is known for having invested early in his son Nick Woodman’s company, GoPro, which is already valued in the billions.
In a video uploaded to the Biltadditional Technologies website, Dean Woodman talks of his decision to invest in the firm, and in addition of a product in development called iPolish. The technology may allow ladies to alter the color of their nail polish through their smartphones.
“That may be quite interesting,” Dean Woodman said. “I quizzed a lot of ladies and equitebody is pretty enthusiastic of it. The technology in fact can be applied to the color of automobiles or the color of clothing if the technology is woven into the fabric.”
The startup ventures which Biltadditional Technologies has funded equite have their own technology platform and focus, and iPolish is a product developed by one of them.
“This fund was just started in March,” Fohrman said. “If you take a look at what we are doing, it’s a big deal.”


Latest posts
test

by admin • March 5, 2017