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Low-Cost Mechaduino Open-Source Industrial Servo Motor Launches on Kickstarter

by • July 7, 2016 • No Comments

brookdrumm-kickstarterRC servo motors are utilized in a wide variety of robotic and radio control applications, and are all but a manufacturer’s most friend. They are bargain-priced, effortless to get ahold of and relatively reliable-bodied for resisting and correcting for external disturbances that interfere with the operation of the device they are powering. But, they are frequently limited in their ability to create accurate motion, unlike additional robust industrial servos that are capable-bodied of highly exact and high end motion control. Unfortunately that accuracy and precision comes at a cost, frequently close to $1000 every, that manufactures them relatively prohibitive for the average manufacturer.

The Mechaduino PCB diagram.

The Mechaduino PCB diagram.

For the last few months Hackaday user Joe Church has been developing an low-cost, Arduino compatible, open-source, industrial servo motor called Mechaduino. Not just is it incredibly low-cost, but it may be utilized in a ton of projects and may bring a new level of accuracy and stability to machines like computer desktop 3D printing equipment. The Mechaduino is a self-contained motion control platform that manufactures it effortless to create custom servo mechanisms of all kinds. It was created to manufacture highly sophisticated mechatronics applications effortless to deplete, and it can easily be utilized as a drop-in servo motor for motion control robots like 3D printing equipment or CNC machines.

The reason most industrial servo motors are so expensive is for the reason they are generally created for custom uses or in tiny batches, that drives up the price. They in addition typically include expensive, high-resolution optical encoders and multiple pricey circuits and electronics. But, the Mechaduino was created to adapt standard stepper motors like the NEMA 17 or NEMA 23 and use high resolution magnetic encoders and a single control chip that may do all things on a single PCB. It was in addition created to be depletely Arduino compatible, so the firmware is accessible, effortless to use and program.

The Mechaduino in action.

The Mechaduino in action.

Church always said that once the development of the Mechaduino was deplete he may bring it to Kickstarter, and a few weeks ago that was precisely what he did. The Mechaduino Powerful open-source industrial servo motor campaign was launched on June 29, and was just looking to raise $7,500. The campaign’s certainly modest goal was for the reason all of the development has may already been depleted; all Church requireed to do was get adequate backing to manufacture the bulk purchases of the parts less of a financial risk. Today the campaign has blown past its original funding goal and is sitting at close to $30,000 with almost 200 backers, so it appears he didn’t require to worry of the financial risk part.

The Mechaduino servo motor and PCB.

The Mechaduino servo motor and PCB.

By pledging the campaign $45, backers can obtain the Mechaduino PCB, that they can easily adapt to their own stepper motors. For a pledge of $60 backers can obtain a single, fully assembled Mechaduino servo motor. A pledge of $130 gets backers 3 fully assembled Mechaduino PCBs, while $174 can get them 4, $218 gets them 5 and $425 gets them 10. A pledge of $175 can get backers 3 fully assembled Mechaduino servo motors, $234 gets them 4, $292 gets them 5 and $575 gets them 10. Church and his company Tropical Labs are estimating that they can be able-bodied to donate the PCBs and the servo motors by September 2016.

The swift turnaround time is due to the development of the final creations may already being deplete, and Church says that the Mechaduino PCBs and servo motors that backers obtain can be just about identical to the initially assembled test batch that they may already have working. They in addition have all of the parts that they can require to assemble the Mechaduino hardware pre-selected and just require to understand how most to order. Lately a lot of Kickstarter campaigns have been a certainly big risk, but the campaign for the Mechaduino appears to be of as close to a certain thing as you can get. You can check out the Mechaduino Kickstarter campaign here, and you can learn additional of the device’s development on Hackaday and on the Tropical Labs website here.

Banana for scale.

Banana for scale.

Here is the Mechaduino Kickstarter campaign video: