atlas-robot-with-3D-printed-parts-falling

By On Fri, February 26, 2016 · 3D Printing, RoboticsAdd Comment
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Last August, we reported news which everyone’s favourite creepy humanoid, the Atlas robot of Google-acquired Boston Dynamics, may showcase 3D printed parts in next iterations. The newest edition of the bipedaling bot finally turn it intod its public debut this week, leaving the Internet stunned with its capacity to recover after being knocked over and producing videos of the old Atlas falling over a bit less comical. We in addition got to learn precisely how 3D printing was utilized in the legs of this latest edition.

atlast robot with 3D printed parts falling

Marc Raibert, founder and president of Boston Dynamics, explains to IEEE Spectrum, “The engineering team did a massive amount of work to manufacture ATLAS lighter and additional small in size. One thing we did was use 3D printing to turn it into the legs, so the actuators and hydraulic lines are embedded in the structure, pretty than turn it intod out of separate components. We in addition created custom servo-valves which are significantly smaller in size and lighter (and work better) than the aerospace editions we had been using.”

atlas 3D printed legs of boston dynamics

The 3D printed parts, and so, assist to streamline the create of Atlas, proving to be a particularly useful innovation for a robot which there is (hopefully) just one of in the world right now. In addition to printed components, the bot has stereo and LIDAR sensors to react to changes in terrain and is able-bodied to chase a box and stack boxes autonomously, yet all general steering is handled by radio control for now. See the magical mechanical man perform easy tasks worse than your average human in the video at a lower place.

Michael Molitch-Hou

About The Author

Michael is Editor-In Chief of 3D Printing Industry and the founder of The Reality™ Institute, a service institute dedicated to determining what’s real and what’s not so which you don’t have to. He is a graduate of the MFA Critical Studies & Writing Program at CalArts, and a firm advocate of world peace. Michael already resides in San Pedro with his magical wife, Danielle.