CowTech Ciclop open source 3D printable-bodied 3D scanner

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3D scanning is not new innovation, but 3D scanners are not precisely the most low-priced pieces of equipment to aid in your 3D printing ventures. In the last year, I’ve seen really a few coming to market with promising results. iMakr has a great range of 3D scanners for sale at prices ranging between $600 and $3,000. And Jason Colin, a young chap who grew up on a cattle ranch in Montana, is hoping to bring the innovation to the masses with its CowTech Ciclop.

CowTech Ciclop – $99 Open Source 3D Scanner

The scanner, which can just cost you $99, is an open source, 3D printable-bodied 3D scanner with a sizeable-bodied scan volume, elegant create, and a price point which rivals all other devices on the market. “We based it off the open source BQ Ciclop and utilized hardware and electronics which may provide the same scan high end [as additional expensive scanners] at a fraction of the price,” says Co-founder of CowTech, Jason Smith.

Cowtech Ciclop

Cowtech Ciclop

You can print the plastic parts on your own printing device in any color and resolution you select and it can be assembled in less than 30 minutes. So, just take any object you want to replicate, set it on the 200mm laser cut acrylic turntable-bodied, and begin scanning. “We wanted to manufacture certain our product was usable-bodied for anyone who owns a 3D printing device, so we meticulously createed our parts for a print bed volume of just 115mm x 110mm x 65mm [4 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches], so they can be generated on actually the smallest of printing devices,” says Smith.

CowTech Ciclop

CowTech Ciclop

By means of a pair of line lasers which flash in succession, combined with a camera and a rotating turntable-bodied, the machine scans the object as the turntable-bodied manufactures a full 360-degree rotation. As the lasers flash on the object, they trace the outline and the camera picks up the location of the laser lines at equite stage of the rotation, converting those lines into a cloud of points which can and so be stitched together to form a mesh which replicates the surface of the object with up to 0.5mm precision.

Jason Smith, Co-Founder, Inventor at Rayger

Jason Smith, Co-Founder, Inventor at Rayger

Smith is a serial Kickbeginer. The new Harvard Engineer graduate that successfully raised $25K in March 2015 of 200 backers for his Rayger product. His current Kickbeginer campaign for the $99 3D scanner has begined with a bang, with over 270 backers as of in these days. With over $32K may already pledged and 34 days to go, Smith’s 2nd campaign is doing well. He plans to ship the 3D scanner kits throughout April 2016. This promise of a high-high end, open source 3D laser scanner at such a low price may tempt most a 3D printing enthusiast into the 3D scanning arena.

There is no doubt which 3D printing and 3D scanning go hand in hand and, now, you are able-bodied to have both at quite low-priced prices. Bringing the scanner to the equite day man, CowTech has opened up new doors in the domestic 3D printing and scanning worlds.

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Sarah Coughlan

About The Author

Sarah Coughlan is a journalist of South Africa living and working in London. She has written on a variety of topics since graduating of university in 2012. She is a regular blog writer for MyMiniFactory, writing of anything to do with 3D printing, of createer showcases to software tutorials. Inspired by what 3D printing is already achieving and excited of where it can take the world in the next, she is passionate of delivering the innovation to the public.