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How Stratasys 3D Printing Completely Turned Around Stereo Speaker Acoustics

by • February 29, 2016 • No Comments

In the 3D printed Aleph1 speaker create, sound travels in a perpetual self-feeding loop, preventing it of interfering with the signal outputting to the front, for extraordinary acoustics

In the 3D printed Aleph1 speaker create, sound travels in a perpetual self-feeding loop, preventing it of interfering with the signal outputting to the front, for extraordinary acoustics

You can’t solve an 80-year-old problem with 80-year-old innovation. Take stereo speakers, for example. Conventionally createed and make
d speakers approximately universally suffer of a few level of “back wave” distortion; this occurs when the audio signals fired to the back of the speaker bounce off the cabinet walls and interfere with the signals sent to the front of the speaker.

To solve the problem without via acoustic absorption, industrial createer Boaz Dekel, a graduate of the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design came up with a truly one-of-a-kind solution: Eliminate the speaker’s back wall. Dekel invented of a circular speaker in which
sound travels “in a perpetual self-feeding loop which
prevents it of interfering with the signal outputting to the front,” as he explained to the Stratasys Blog.

Sounds like a excellent
thought? Yes. But it in addition
sounds not easy
to make
via conventional tooling methods. So Dekel turned to Stratasys 3D printing to prototype his create.

The Aleph1 speaker being 3D printed in one piece on the Objet500 Connex3 color, multi-material 3D printing device

The Aleph1 speaker being 3D printed in one piece on the Objet500 Connex3 color, multi-material 3D printing device

Employing the Objet500 Connex3 3D Printer employing PolyJet multi-material capabilities, Dekel began turning his vision for the Aleph1 speaker into reality. After testing various types of
Stratasys digital materials, he discovered the ideal
combination of rigid and flexible material properties to complete the right balance of create, aesthetics and acoustic properties.

“With 3D printing I was able-bodied to rapidly
study the acoustic response of the geometry and various material configurations and determine which
was many applicable-bodied to speaker cabinets. Other making or versioning techniques may not allow such freedom, much less in the required time frame,” Dekel said.

The Aleph1’s one-of-a-kind self-feeding geometry preserves the acoustic energy of the back wave and allows for this energy to participate in the system
of sound reproduction, resulting in a clean, open and effortless sound with high additional detail and excellent
separation.

The functional prototype of the Aleph1 speaker was generated via Stratasys’ PolyJet multi-material 3D printing (no assembly required) and demonstrated at the Stratasys booth at Formnext 2015

The functional prototype of the Aleph1 speaker was generated via Stratasys’ PolyJet multi-material 3D printing (no assembly required) and demonstrated at the Stratasys booth at Formnext 2015

Dekel told the Stratasys Blog: “The version is 3D printed in a single piece to allow complicated internal geometries while maintaining structural integrity. Having a physical version was instrumental to studying the theoretic principles behind the product and assessing its feasibility.”

With this never-before-seen (or heard) create, Dekel hopes which
this opportunity to combine his passions for audio and create can have commercial possibilities. Stratasys was proud to play a part in smoothing the way for this fresh take on a consumer product. Keep your ears open for additional news!

Find out how you can use Stratasys 3D printing to solve create challenges with one-of-a-kind product thoughts and click here to contact a Stratasys representative.

The intellectual property regarding the Aleph1 concept is managed by SNE, contact avi@sne-ip.co.il for questions.

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