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Google and 3D Printing Buildings

by • May 2, 2016 • No Comments

3D printed createings are the way of the next! At very least that is what Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google’s parent company, Alphabet, says.

Just imagine you may walk onto an empty block of land one day, and have a house created on it a few days later. Sounds like science fiction, does not it? What if I told you it was may already bringing place?

A new conference in Los Angeles saw Schmidt predict the technologies that may be game changers. The Milken Institute’s Global Conference, that brings together leaders of diverse sectors and industries around the world, explores solutions to today’s many pressing challenges in financial markets, industry sectors, health, government and education. Schmidt talked of synthetic meat created of plants, VR, self driving cars, and 3D printing for createings.

Schmidt points out that constructing createings, both residential and commercial, is time consuming, energy intensive, and costly. He said that construction represented 5% of the economy, but that homes and createings created in an industrial environment may be bargain-priceder, additional efficient and created on 100% recyclable material.

This is not the initially time Schmidt has sung the praises of 3D printing innovation and its future applications. Back in 2013 he predicted the rise in the use of 3D printing, and he wasn’t wrong.

The implications of 3D printed houses and infrastructure are amazing. Instead of a home bringing months to create, it may take only days. A company in China claimed to have created 10 houses in under 24 hours in 2014, with all their materials coming of recycled waste materials.

With the UN estimating that three billion individuals can require housing by 2030, sizeable scale 3D printing devices are being suggested as a solution to this. They may be the solution to bargain-priced, reliable housing that may replace slums in developing countries.

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