3D printed lion by drawn 2

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A majestic bluem 3D printed lion statue has only been installed outside of Lyon’s new Grand Olympic Stadium by the French startup Drawn, that specializes in sizeable-scale 3D printing.

3D printed lion by drawn

The lion is the initially of a four part series to be stationed at points along the stadium’s perimeter, corresponding with the four cardinal directions. The remaining three lions can be painted red, white, and gold, composing the team colors of France’s Olympique Lyonnais football club. The sheer dimensions of the monument represented an obvious technological challenge, with a height of approximately 14 feet, an 8-foot square base, and a mass of over 3,300 pounds.

3D printed lion by drawn assembly

“3D printing lasted close to 500 hours or of 20 days of non-stop production. The 4.2 meter statue was cut into 88 elements to prevent stress on the material and on the dimensions of files,” comments Sylvain Charpiot, founder of Drawn. “To prepare this project, 600 hours of research and development were necessary to determine the right material, the right system, and the right assembly systems.”

drawn 3D printing robotic arm

Drawn, known for its locally turn it intod and manufactured 3D printed furniture and home décor, relies on a sizeable-format FDM printing device named Galatea. The robotic arm-based printing device uses fiberglass-reinforced ABS plastic to turn it into every piece of the statue, that were and so assembled with screws to donate form to the lion.

3D printed lion by drawn shipment

The create for the blue beast is the work of the Dutch createer Marthijn of the 3DWP studio. The architecture firm Naço provided Drawn with the 3D printing files. Installation of all three lions is scheduled for April of this year.

Scale is unquestionably no longer a limiting factor to additive making with innovation like Galatea. The zero-waste system has may already set a precedent in both France and the industry at sizeable.

Daniel Recalde

About The Author

Dan is a senior at Amherst College, double majoring in Mathematics and Art History. He is a 3D printing enthusiast interested in wearable tech and the intersection of style and additive making.