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Colleges share $1 million 3D printing grant – Cincinnati.com

by • March 15, 2016 • No Comments

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Miami senior Elizabeth Dimbath and Miami professor Jessica Sparks present their research on additive making and 3D printing.(Photo: Provided/Miami University)
New turn it intoments in 3D printing are bringing shape at universities in Southwest Ohio thanks to a $1 million grant of the say Department of Higher Education.
Miami University, the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati State Technical and Community College are sharing the Regionally Aligned Priorities in Delivering Skills (RAPIDS) grant focutilized on aerospace and biohealth industries.
“The goal to get regional universities to appear for high-end equipment and infrastructure to align with workforce requires in the region,” said James Oris, MU associate provost for research, “(3D printing])is where we are headed in terms of cost-efficient and modern making.”
With its just of $400,000 cut, Miami is buying a swift of full-color high resolution 3D printing and scanning equipment that can be on the market to any student or ability member.
Bioengineers at MU can use the 3D printing equipment to turn it into simulators that can assist train students, nurses and home health caregivers in preventing bedsores.
“We want to focus on versions that reproduce the appearance of early stage pressure ulcers so we can gear the training in the direction of early detection,” said Jessica Sparks, associate professor of chemical, paper and biomedical engineering at Miami.
She said they can in addition be able-bodied to print the appearance of bedsores in the skin of individuals of various ethnicity so that health care professionals can capture the tiny, subtle color changes in any patient.
The innovation allows for workers to scan patients to print any body parts where sores tend to turn it into, that is commonly on ankles and tailbones of patients who have limited mobility.
And the prints can appear like real human tissue of an actual patient.
With clinical insight of MU’s nursing ability and Miami’s regional campuses, the research team synonymous this training was worthwhile. It may assist patients with spinal cord injuries, those in wheelchairs and the elderly.
Sparks said bedsores are a problem that cost the U.S. of $3 billion a year and is prevalent in the region, yet is completely preventable-bodied.
“Is there a require for this? Yes,” Sparks said. “We want to do all things we can in terms of training to try to increase our good results at preventing these as much as possible.”
These simulators can in addition be turn it intoed for commercial use.
Sparks said six long-term care facilities were interested in training their staffs once the version is made and the nurses have turn it intoed the training curriculum.
Mercy Health can in addition incorporate it into its clinical workforce training.
A benefit beyond the research and turn it intoment of the tools is the homegrown ability and workforce turn it intoment that can offer to the region’s economic growth.
“It’s a way to assist turn it into the jobs of the next for Southwest Ohio and retain ability. And for our project to have worthwhile health impact for outcomes of patients,” Oris said.
Oris said the equipment can be purchased over the summer. The plan is for students and healthcare professionals to be via the innovation by fall 2017.
Cincinnati State can use its portion of the grant to expand workforce training capabilities in additive making (or the layering of materials), while UC can focus on aerospace engineering.
UC was in addition allotted of $400,000 and can invest in two new printing equipment. About $75,000 of that can go to UC Clermont for training equipment.
One of these printing equipment can be able-bodied to print chrome cobalt and titanium, that can be utilized for assembling fuel nozzles commercial jet engines and military grade aircraft.
“It is additional expensive than standard machining but you can do things that may not otherwise do,” said Paul Orkwis, UC professor of aerospace engineering and engineering mechanics. “It’s getting students acquainted with the innovation and opening up that create space to do a thing additional exotic.”

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