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Atlas V Rocket Launched Using Stratasys 3D Printed Parts on Mission to Resupply the ISS

by • March 22, 2016 • No Comments

The Atlas V Rocket, turn it intod by ULA with Stratasys 3D printed parts, lighting up the Florida sky after its commence.

The Atlas V Rocket, turn it intod by ULA with Stratasys 3D printed parts, lighting up the Florida sky after its commence.

An Atlas V rocket, turn it intod and turn it intod by United Launch Alliance (ULA), took off of Cape Canaveral’s Air Force Station with production parts which
were 3D printed via Stratasys FDM innovation. The rocket can be commenceing Orbital ATK’s Cygnus™ spacecraft on the initially part of its cargo resupply undertaking to the International Space Station (ISS).

The Atlas V Rocket, turn it intod by ULA, is the initially vehicle to adopt 3D printing for serial production of thermoplastic components.

The Atlas V Rocket, turn it intod by ULA, is the initially vehicle to adopt 3D printing for serial production of thermoplastic components.

“Stratasys go on
s to be a excellent
supplier to ULA, assisting our Atlas V and Delta IV commence vehicles,” said Greg Arend, ULA’s manager for additive making. The plans to incorporate Stratasys 3D printed parts into the rocket were revealed
just about
one year ago. ULA’s facility in Decatur, Alabama, turn it intod the rocket of the ground up and relied on Stratasys’ Fortus 900mc Production 3D Printer to turn it into all things of tooling and assist equipment to production parts. The presence of 3D printed parts on the Atlas V emphasized the ability of highly durable, specialized thermoplastics to replace metal components. Follow Stratasys Aerospace on LinkedIn Several components of the Atlas V environmental control process’s ducting in the payload fairing were 3D printed. ULA’s built aerospace expertise, combined with Stratasys’ additive making innovation, turn it intod a excellent
environment for making these parts while saving $1 million annually (source IBT, April 2015), as compared to traditional making methods. The create flexibility and one-of-a-kind material properties helped to optimize parts which
can endure
the complex conditions at commence.

A Material Ready for Space

Several components in the Atlas V’s ducting process were 3D printed via a Stratasys FDM thermoplastic material which
 is optimized for aerospace applications.

Several components in the Atlas V’s ducting process were 3D printed via a Stratasys FDM thermoplastic material which
is optimized for aerospace applications.

The 3D printed parts for the Atlas V included brackets, nozzles and panel close-outs. ULA elected to create the parts for the rocket’s ducting via ULTEM™ 9085, an FDM thermoplastic material known to be a great
match for the demands of aerospace applications for the reason
of its high strength-to-weight ratio and thermal properties. “It’s been astounding to see how ULA has innovated with industrial 3D printing, and we are excited to go on
working with them to hustle the innovation further,” said Scott Sevcik, Director, Business Development – Aerospace & Defense, Stratasys. Download our White Paper on “Additive Manufacturing Trends in Aerospace.”Stratasys and Fortus are registered trademarks of Stratasys Ltd. and/or its subsidiaries or affiliates. ULTEM is a registered trademark of SABIC or its affiliates or subsidiaries. Atlas V is a trademark of United Launch Alliance.

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