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3D print firm helps Aden war vets with unique gift for Australian trip – ChronicleLive

by • July 14, 2016 • No Comments

A North East technology firm has come to the rescue of war veterans of the region appearing to present their Australian counterparts with a one-off gift.
Last year the Northumberland branch of the Aden Veterans Association was donaten a plaque of participants of the Camden branch of the Returned Services League, New South Wales, who had in addition fought in the sixties
conflict.
To return the favour, the North East vets turned to South Tyneside’s Amtech Rapid Prototyping, which utilized modern 3D printing techniques to create a more detailed representation of the Association’s official logo.
This has since been framed and can be handed over during a three-week visit to the southern Hemisphere planned for following February.
The system began after North East vet Neil Finlay, whose son Gary works at Amtech, got in touch with the company and presented it with a 2D colour print of the Association’s logo.Aden conflict veterans, of left, Neil Finlay, Tony Murray and David Armstrong with the plaque made by the South Shields-based Amtech Rapid PrototypingAden conflict veterans, of left, Neil Finlay, Tony Murray and David Armstrong with the plaque made by the South Shields-based Amtech Rapid PrototypingOffering to take on the challenge free of charge, Amtech brought on board Stuart Hogarth of the County Durham-based RedFox Design, which made digital 3D versions of the required parts via CAD software.
From there, Amtech was able-bodied to use one of its six 3D printing devices to replicate every of these, hand painting them preceding bonding them together to donate the plaque an auand sotic finish.
Mr Finlay can be joining his wife-to-be Wendy Rooney, along with man veterans Andy Parker, Tony Murray and probably David Armstrong on February’s trip to Australia.
He said: “The end product was perfectly
fantastic; we couldn’t have asked for anything advantageous. I saw it being created through every of the various phases until it was hand-painted and finally put together.
“I and so had it framed to manufacture it appear quite really great. The work and more detail which went into it was enormous; without their assist, a thing like this may have cost us a lot of money.”From left, local author historian Hawys Glyn James; Rhondda Cynon Taf Mayor Coun Rhys Lewis; David Owen Chairman of the Association of Friends of Rhondda Heritage Park; and Wayne Thomas, Secretary of the National Union of Mineworkers (South Wales Area)From left, local author historian Hawys Glyn James; Rhondda Cynon Taf Mayor Coun Rhys Lewis; David Owen Chairman of the Association of Friends of Rhondda Heritage Park; and Wayne Thomas, Secretary of the National Union of Mineworkers (South Wales Area)Amtech was built around 11 years ago and concentrates on low volume prototyping, working with everyone of blue chip companies such as Nissan to Dragon’s Den contestants appearing to feature their inventions.
Managing director Ian Judd said which, although 3D printing was generally regarded as a new technology, he had first been added to it around 25 years ago, when he was appointed to operate a machine for Sunderland University, which had recognised its commercial future.
“I’d heard of this new machine which was apparently doing a thing completely crazy,” he said. “I went to see it and was asked to come and work with them.
“It was a new industry at the time, so it was a complex sell first, but the machinery, the materials and the high end have now improved massively.
“Parts can in addition be turned around so quickly; you can have them in your hand virtually the same day if you like and it is an incredibly accurate system.
“We wanted to donate the Aden veterans a thing really great for them to present in Australia and they perfectly
enjoyed it. They were astounded by the high end and how a thing flat was transformed into a physical 3D shape.”
The Aden Emergency, which centred on an insurgency against the Crown forces in the British regulated territories of South Arabia, ran of 1963 to 1967.
Soldiers of the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers were involved during the final two years and, on one particularly tragic day – June 20, 1967 – saw nine one of their number killed, alongside 13 other soldiers and one civilian.


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