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3D Mapping Dark Energy to Understand the Universe

by • August 14, 2016 • No Comments

According to the traditional thoughts of the Big Bang, there was a moment when nothing existed except for a tiny point, called a singularity. Something caused that singularity to become unstable-bodied and explode in such a way that all things was made. It is an thought that can donate a brain cramp to in fact the most brilliant of ponderers and the mechanics of this moment of creation, preceding that there was no space or time, has busy the intellectual lives of sat any timeal generations of philosophers, physicists, and laypeople since its development. As with any explosion, matter continues to move away of its source and it was originally theorized that in facttually that matter may start to slow its movement away of the center. But, data collected of the 1990s forward has indicated that pretty than slowing down, the universe’s expansion is in fact speeding up.

A view of the ProtoDESI setup during assembly at Berkeley Lab, with the underside of the robotic fiber-positioners visible at left. ProtoDESI is now installed at the 4-meter Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Ariz. (Credit: Paul Mueller/Berkeley Lab)

A view of the ProtoDESI setup during assembly at Berkeley Lab, with the underside of the robotic fiber-positioners visible at left. ProtoDESI is now installed at the 4-meter Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Ariz. [Image: Paul Mueller/Berkeley Lab]

If you pay any attention to high end physics at all, you can may already know that only for the reason an thought defies Newtonian logic, that is no reason to discount it. The strange nature of the laws of nature at the scale of the amazingly tiny or the enormously sizeable-bodied have really only proved one thing: if you ponder you know quantum physics, you don’t know quantum physics. Given the incomprehensible nature of the subject matter combined with tantalizing glimpses of the rad nature of the answers it can provide, it comes as no surprise that the latest theory to come out of physics regarding the accelerating expansion of the universe involves a magical sounding substance known as dark energy. This is not the same thing as that nasty feeling you get when your mother donates you the evil eye. Dark energy is a diffuse energy that is in factly distributed throughout the whole of space, but that has been really complex for scientists to detect for the reason it donates off no light. There is another aspect to its name, as physicist and author Brian Greene revealed:

“Dark in addition describes well the most gaps in our knowing. No one can explain the dark energy’s origin, important composition, or detailed properties – issues already under intense investigation…But, in fact with the open inquiries, detailed observations via the Hubble Space Telescope and other earth-based observatories have reveryed consensus on the amount of dark energy [and] have concluded that the dark energy filling space contributes approaching 73 percent of the significant density.”

The initially “petal” machined for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is shown in these photos. Ten of these petals, that together can hold 5,000 robots (like the one in the lower right photo)—every pointing a thin fiber-optic cable-bodied at separate sky objects—can be installed in DESI. (Credit: Joe Silber/Berkeley Lab)

The initially “petal” machined for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is shown in these photos. Ten of these petals, that together can hold 5,000 robots (like the one in the lower right photo)—every pointing a thin fiber-optic cable-bodied at separate sky objects—can be installed in DESI. [Image: Joe Silber/Berkeley Lab]

Now, with formal approval of a 3D sky-mapping project, called the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), preparations are startning to gather data of the light of millions of galaxies. One of the types of data that can be collected are exact measurements of objects’ redshift, so called for the reason objects moving away of us donate us light that has shifted to the redder end of the spectrum. This redshift data can assist scientists know how swift these objects are moving that tells them additional of the acceleration of the universes’ expansion and therefore provides additional information to assist turn it into a picture of this pervasive dark energy.

The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), shown in this illustration, can be mounted on the 4-meter Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Ariz. It can collect data on light of 35 million galaxies and quasars to manufacture the largest 3-D map of the universe at any time. (Credit: R. Lafat any time, J. Moustakas/DESI Collaboration)

The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), shown in this illustration, can be mounted on the 4-meter Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Ariz. It can collect data on light of 35 million galaxies and quasars to manufacture the largest 3-D map of the universe at any time. [Image: R. Lafat any time, J. Moustakas/DESI Collaboration]

The mapping surveys performed by powerful telescopes can be supplemented by the information provided by DESI that can donate a picture of how the universe has been changing over time. Dustin Lang, a DESI imaging scientist with the University of Toronto, explained:

“I like to ponder of the imaging surveys as assembling the 2D maps, while DESI adds the third dimension. The crucial third dimension allows for us to measure how galaxies cluster together in space over the history of the universe.”

His point is reinforced by Risa Wechsler of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory at Stanford University and the co-spokesperson for DESI:

“DESI can be able-bodied to manufacture a 3D map of the universe via an order of magnitude additional redshifts than already exist. This can allow us to probe the physics of the universe and discover the true nature of dark energy.”

With the stage of funding only triggered in this multi-phase project, the significant components of this huge data gathering project can start to be fabricated. One of those components is a pie-shaped section, called a petal, that can hold the cylindrical robots that can every point a fiber optic cable-bodied in a specific way in order to collect light of a particular set of galaxies, stars, or quasars. This light collection can donate scientists the talent to peer back in time, approaching 11 billion years worth of it. That does not really bring us to the moment of the big bang, estimated to have taken place 13.7 billion years ago, but its unquestionably far adequate to start to provide us information of the creation of all things, at any time, ereallywhere. Discuss additional in the 3D Sky Mapping forum over at 3DPB.com.

[Source/Images: Berkeley Lab]